Seminole Nation Case Study

How were some of the members of the Seminole Nation able to avoid removal? These sources allow you to further to investigate this story of American Indian removal.

This treaty proposed the removal of the Seminole Nation from Florida. This version is not the final version of the treaty.

Be the Political Analyst

Why was the 1832 Treaty with the Seminole made?

  1. What land was the Seminole Nation told to give up?
  2. What was the Seminole Nation being offered in exchange for their lands?
  3. Which other people were the Seminole Nation supposed to live with (according to this treaty)?
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Seminole treaty

Treaty with the Seminole, 1832. Courtesy National Archives, Washington, D.C.

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Article I

The Seminole Indians relinquish to the United States, all claim to the lands they at present occupy in the Territory of Florida, and agree to emigrate to the country assigned to the Creeks, west of the Mississippi river; it being understood that an additional extent of territory, proportioned to their numbers, will be added to the Creek country, and that the Seminoles will be received as a constituent part of the Creek nation, and be re-admitted to all the privileges as members of the same.

Article II

For and in consideration of the relinquishment of claim in the first article of this agreement, and in full compensation for all the improvements, which may have been made on the lands thereby ceded; the United States stipulate to pay the Seminole Indians fifteen thousand four hundred (15,400) dollars, to be divided among the chiefs and warriors of the several towns, in a ration proportioned to their population, the respective proportions of each to be paid on their arrival in the country they consent to remove to; it being understood that their faithful interpreters Abraham and Cudjo shall receive two hundred dollars each of the above sum, in full remuneration for the improvements to be abandoned on the lands now cultivated by them.

Article III

The United States agree to distribute as they arrive at their new homes in the Creek Territory, west of the Mississippi river, a blanket and homespun frock, to each of the warriors, women and children of the Seminole tribe of Indians

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Article I

The Seminole Indians will give the United States all ownership of the lands they currently occupy in the Territory of Florida. The Seminole Indians agree to leave the Territory of Florida and move to the country assigned to the Creeks, which is west of the Mississippi river. They understand that the United States government will add more land to Creek country, based on the number of Seminoles who move there. When the Seminoles arrive in Creek country, they will become a part of the Creek nation, and they will have the same rights as other members of the Creek nation.

Article II

As stated in Article 1, the Seminole Indians will give the United States all ownership of the lands they currently occupy in the Territory of Florida. To pay them for the land and any improvements the Seminoles made to the land, the United States will pay the Seminole Indians $15,400. This payment will be divided among the chiefs and warriors of the Seminole towns. The Seminole Indians will receive their portion of the payment when they arrive in the Creek country they have agreed to move to. Abraham and Cudjo, the Seminole interpreters, will each receive $200 of the total amount paid to the Seminoles. The $200 payment is for the improvements they made to the land they will leave behind.

Article III

When the Seminole Indians arrive at their new homes in the Creek Territory, west of the Mississippi River, the United States agrees to give each warrior, woman, and child a blanket and an outfit made of plain fabric.

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