Mother Earth and Indian Summer Showcase 2008 Mother Earth
Symposium June 13A Call to Consciousness

Elders Rico Newman (Piscataway–Conoy Indians) and Oren Lyons (Onondaga); scientists Anthony Socci, Daniel Wildcat (Yuchi, Muscogee Nation of Oklahoma), and Nasbah Ben (Navajo); and author-activist Winona LaDuke (Anishinaabekwe, Mississippi Band Anishinaabeg) discuss the scale of the climate challenge facing the Earth and solutions being pioneered on Indian lands across the United States.

Introduced by Tim Johnson (Mohawk), NMAI associate director for museum programs; moderated by José Barreiro (Taino), NMAI assistant director for research.

Program DetailsWatch the Webcast
Documentary Film Screenings June 14Waterbuster

Producer/director/editor/writer: J. Carlos Peinado (Mandan/Hidatsa)
Producer/editor/writer: Daphne Ross
Production associate: Hillary Abe (Hidatsa/Mandan)

Old memories surface when filmmaker J. Carlos Peinado visits the Upper Missouri River Basin in North Dakota, his ancestral homeland. There he investigates the impact of the massive Garrison Dam project, constructed in the 1950s, which laid waste to a self-sufficient American Indian community, submerging 156,000 acres of fertile land and ultimately displacing the people of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation.

www.waterbuster.org

Discussion with Daphne Ross to follow the screening, moderated by Daniel Wildcat (Yuchi member of the Muscogee Nation of Oklahoma), director, Haskell Environmental Research Studies Center, Haskell Indian Nations University.

March Point

Director; Annie Silverstein
Producer: Tracy Rector (Seminole)
Produced by Longhouse Media, Seattle/Native Lens
Native Lens youth filmmakers: Cody Cayou (Swinomish), Nick Clark (Swinomish), and Travis Tom (Swinomish)

Three teens from the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community in Washington State participate in a media training program. Their initial plan is to make a gangster movie. Instead, they end up taking a good look, for the first time, at two oil refineries sitting on March Point, land previously owned by their tribe as defined in the Treaty of Point Elliot.

www.marchpointmovie.com

Discussion with Tracy Rector, Travis Tom, and community member Ray Williams (Swinomish) to follow the screening, moderated by Daniel Wildcat.

Indian Summer Showcase
2008 Kickoff Concert - June 13
Indigenous Indigenous - Rock and blues
Artist Website
Artist Bio

Formed in the 1990s by Mato Nanji (Nakota), his brother, sister, and a cousin, this group rocketed to fame with the release of their first album, Things We Do (Pachyderm, 1998). Mato’s style and skills as a guitarist have earned him comparisons to Jimi Hendrix, Carlos Santana, and Stevie Ray Vaughn. Honors from the Native American Music Awards have included “Album of the Year,” “Group of the Year,” and “Best Pop Group.” Although his siblings and cousin have left the band, Mato continues to front the band, and his latest recording, Chasing the Sun (Vanguard, 2006), rose to number two on Billboard’s “Top Blues Albums” list. A recent New York Times reviewer wrote, “Indigenous offered straight blues elevated to spectacular heights by the fleet playing of the guitarist Mato Nanji.”

Bill Miller Bill Miller - Singer/Songwriter
Artist Website
Artist Bio

Singer/Songwriter Bill Miller (Mohican) is from northern Wisconsin, the son of Mohican-German parents. His tribe is properly called Mahicanuk, which means People From Where The Waters Are Never Still, a name that describes the woodlands and waterways of the reservation where Bill grew up. An award-winning recording artist, performer, songwriter, activist, and painter, Bill Miller received the 2005 GRAMMY for Best Native American Album for Cedar Dream Songs (Cool Springs). He has recorded more than a dozen solo albums and tours internationally as a solo artist and with his band. Bill’s paintings have been shown in prestigious galleries throughout the country.

Kuyayky Friday, June 27 - Kuyayky - Andean traditional
Artist Website
Artist Bio

Kuyayky (“to love” in the Quechua language) is a group of musicians who understand the importance of cultural awareness as a way to maintain and foster the social, political, cultural, and economic development of humanity. Through their music, Kuyayky works to contribute to the understanding of cultural diversity as a key to human development and peace. The group’s goal is to reach out to the world community through music that is as innovative as it is traditional. Residing in the U.S. since 1993, the members of Kuyayky have maintained strong connections with Peru and their Xauxa heritage. Together, the group works diligently to bring attention not just to Andean culture, through concerts and workshops here and abroad, but also to causes, including education and earthquake recovery, in their homeland. Founded by Jose Hurtado Zamudo (composer, choir director, and dancer) and Edda Bonilla Peña (singer, composer, dancer), Kuyayky also includes Rubi Indira Hurtado (singer, guitar and tiple player, dancer), Jose Luis Hurtado, Jr. (singer; musical director; guitar, mandolin, charango, ronroco, and tiple player; dancer), Yina Esmeralda Hurtado (singer; charango, ronroco, and tiple player; dancer), Mariluz del Rosario Hurtado (singer; quena, sikus, flute, and cajon player; dancer), and Candy Flor de Maria Hurtado (singer; bombo-leguero, cajon, and tinya player; dancer).

This program received federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.

The Plateros Friday, July 11 - The Plateros - Rock and Blues
Artist Website
Artist Bio

The Plateros—featuring 16-year-old Levi Platero on guitar and vocals; his father, Murphy, on bass; and cousin, Doug, on drums—are from Tohajillee, New Mexico, the Eastern Agency of the Navajo Nation. They merge blues, rock, gospel, and funk with a positive message. After a few short years playing in public, they have already earned comparisons to such groups as Los Lonely Boys and Indigenous. Levi Platero’s hard-driving exuberance on guitar is nothing short of extraordinary for someone so young. The Plateros have become well-known in New Mexico, and their current tour schedule has them playing concerts, festivals, and fairs in Arizona, Washington State, Ontario, Michigan, Missouri, Florida, and Texas.

Jamie Coon Friday, July 25 - Jamie Coon - Singer/songwriter
Artist Website
Artist Bio

Raised in Oklahoma, Jamie Coon (Creek/Seminole) is a graduate of the Musicians Institute in Hollywood, California, where she received the Outstanding Student of the Year award. She blends soulful rhythms to pop melodies with guitarists Rafael Barajas and Eric Sampson. In 2007 Jamie was recognized as the Best Out of County performer by the Orange County Music Awards and the Singer/Songwriter of the Year by the Payne County Line/Oklahoma Music Awards. Her CD is entitled Everything So Far (2005).

Tonemah Friday, August 8 - Tonemah - Native Americana
Artist Website
Artist Bio

Darryl Tonemah (Kiowa/Comanche/Tuscarora) combines the energy of rock, the intelligence of folk, and the heart of country to create a musical niche he calls Native Americana. Darryl has two interesting careers—one as a behavioral psychologist and the other as a rising musician—and he says it’s difficult sometimes to keep the two worlds separate. While he may wonder “who wants their psychologist to be a rock star, and who wants their rock star to be a psychologist,” he appears to be having success in both. The director of the Health Promotion Program at the University of Oklahoma College of Continuing Education, he has won accolades from the Native American Music Awards for his CDs. Darryl’s most popular song is one of his first: “Powwow Snag,” which he wrote on the back of a Wal-Mart receipt before giving a speech to Native youth about healthy behaviors. Darryl is joined by Loren “LP” Tonemah (Kiowa/Comanche/Tuscarora) providing vocals and percussion; Kris Brayley (Tuscarora), vocals and drums; Eric Koban (Mohawk), guitar; and Bruce Wojick, bass.

Tonolec Friday, August 22 - Tonolec - Tradition-infused electronica
Artist Website
Artist Bio

Singer Charo Bogarín and instrumentalist Diego Pérez combine electronic music and the ethnic music of their native Chaco Province, Argentina. After significant success in Argentina and Spain, including winning an MTV competition, these young artists dedicated the last three years to researching Toba culture and exchanging musical experiences with indigenous communities in northeastern Argentina. Their purpose was to enrich their music by focusing on their own social and cultural roots. Tonolec blends electronica with the Toba music and rhyme they learned from the elders of the communities they visited. Their work with indigenous communities gave birth to their name (“tonolec” is the name of a local bird) and to the sound of their music: a powerful feminine voice in dialogue with nature and electronics. Their repertoire includes original compositions and arrangements of traditional songs.

This program received federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.

Visitors have the opportunity to meet the performers, who will talk about their music, culture, and other interests and pursuits in a relaxed, informal setting.

The Mitsitam Native Foods Cafe will offer light refreshments and beverages.